In time for Easter we've rounded up a few cracking (sorry) Easter facts you may not have known to keep you going.

Easter is upon us and while the weather forecast looks pretty grim (there’s nothing quite like a rainy Easter egg hunt), we’re taking comfort in the fact that chocolate – lots of it – will feature heavily. In the meantime, here are a few cracking (sorry) Easter facts you may not have known to keep you going.

Easter Eggs were originally a pagan tradition…


‘Pisanka’ is the common Polish name for an egg (usually chicken, goose or duck), which has been richly ornamented using a wax-resistant method (batik). But its origins aren’t in Christianity. In fact, pisanki started off as a pagan tradition and were only later absorbed by Christianity to become the traditional Easter Egg, which now symbolises the resurrection of Christ.

The most expensive Easter egg ever sold for £20 million…


The egg was discovered by a scrap metal dealer at a bric-a-brac market, who, sensing something special about it, forked out £8000 for the purchase. After failing to sell the egg on and doing some research into its background, he discovered that he was in fact the owner of a £20 million missing Fabergé egg, dating back to the 19th century. The egg previously belonged to Empress Maria Feodorovna and was given to her as an Easter gift from her husband, Emperor Alexander III in 1877.

The world’s largest Easter Egg hunt consisted of 501,000 eggs…


Over 9,753 children searched for the eggs accompanied by their parents at the Cypress Gardens Adventure Park in Winter Haven Florida, USA, on 1 April 2007. An attempt to break this record last year ended up in a scramble at an Easter egg hunt fundraising event last year (2015) when children and adults failed to wait for the official start of the hunt. Greedy so and sos.

The first chocolate eggs appeared in the 19th century…


Previously, chicken or duck eggs had been decorated to celebrate Easter, but when the first chocolate eggs appeared in France and Germany around 1800 and were hard and bitter, but they became popular quickly. As chocolate making techniques were improved they became hollow, like the ones we have today.

The world’s biggest Easter egg weighed a whopping 17,637 pounds…


In 2015, tens of thousands of people gathered in Bariloche, Argentina, one of the chocolate making capitals of the world, to taste the world’s biggest handmade Easter egg. According to the local tourist office, the egg weighed 17,637 pounds, stood at 27.9 feet high and boasted a 19.7 foot diameter. About 18 producers and 70 students worked to create the massive egg, whereupon it was enjoyed by tourists and residents of the town.

Approximately 80 million Easter eggs are sold in the UK every year…


Easter chocolate sales make up 10 per cent of Britain’s annual spending on chocolate. On average, each person in Britain eats approx. 9.5kg chocolate per year, putting us joint 4th in the league table of per capita consumption, behind Switzerland, Germany and Austria.


March 2016